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This has been a very entertaining and enjoyable book. It covers Prince William’s life from day one, and gives the reader some background as to what his parents’ life was like before he was born. I know the public tend to judge both his parents in one way or another, but to me they are just humans with a lot of issues like anybody else. Even Diana, with all her charm and good will had her emotional ups and downs, but I don’t doubt that she did her best to raise both princes. And the same goes for Prince Charles. What must have certainly been hard is reading about his parents’ fights, quarrels and divorce in the papers and tabloids. But still, Prince William turned out fine and is a well adjusted man.

He’s definitely a very likeable young man, regardless of his noble titles. He’s quiet, likes to keep a low profile whenever possible and he’s very committed to his work being it in the army as a rescue pilot or raising money for charities and foundations. He always does the right thing, morally and ethically speaking, and he seems to be very down to earth. He tries to live a normal life, if that is at all possible in such a bizarre world, but I think he does it quite well. Whoever is interested in the Royal Family can have a good time reading this book, and learn a couple of things about their private lives, specially the Prince’s.

His face is recognized the world over, his story is well known. But what is Prince William really like?

As Diana’s eldest son, he was her confidant. While the tabloids eagerly lapped up the lurid details of his parents’ divorce, William lived painfully through it, suffering the embarrassment, the humiliation, and divided loyalties. He watched his father denounced on prime time television; he met the lovers. And when he was just fifteen, his beautiful, loving mother was suddenly, shocking snatched from his life forever. The nation lost its princess and its grief threatened the very future of the monarchy. What was almost forgotten in the clamor was that two small boys had lost their mother. His childhood was a recipe for disaster, yet as he approaches his thirtieth birthday, William is as well-balanced and sane a man as you could ever hope to meet. He has an utter determination to do the right thing and to serve his country as his grandmother has so successfully done for the last sixty years.

Who stopped him from going off the rails, turning his back on his duty and wanting nothing to do with the press—the people he blamed for his mother’s death? Where did the qualities that have so entranced the world, and his new bride, Catherine, come from? In the last thirty years, Penny Junor has written extensively about his parents and the extended family into which he was born. With the trust built up over that time, she has been able to get closer to the answers than ever before.

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